COVID-19 cases on rise in Boston, other areas of Massachusetts

Many areas of Massachusetts are seeing an uptick of COVID-19 cases, including the city of Boston. The rise of cases also comes as some large events are being held in-person for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began. , the Duckling Day Parade from the Parkman Bandstand in Boston Common to the “Make Way for Ducklings” sculpture in the Public Garden was held Sunday, the first such celebration since 2019.In addition, the popular “Lilac Sunday” event returned to Harvard University’s Arnold Arboretum in Boston for the first time in three years. Boston Mayor Michelle Wu was on hand for the Duckling Day Parade, which drew hundreds of children and their families. Wu said there are no plans to reinstitute a mask mandate for the city, but she said the Boston Public Health Commission is closely monitoring the number of positive COVID-19 cases, COVID-19 hospitalizations and waste water testing data.”If you look back at historic data from pandemics in the past, often Year 3 is whe n there’s a little bit of fatigue about living with these policies, but the virus is still very much here,” the mayor said. The BPHC voted to drop Boston’s indoor mask mandate starting on March 5. But late last month, the city’s health commission released new safety precautions, which included a renewed push to wear masks while inside crowded places.Dr. Todd Ellerin, chief of infectious diseases at South Shore Health, said the increase of people who are vaccinated against COVID-19 and those who are carrying antibodies will help combat the impact of future subvariants of the coronavirus.”Even though the virus has gotten more contagious, we’ve also gotten stronger,” Ellerin said. “Overall, I’m optimistic about the fact that we continue to uncouple cases from hospitalizations and deaths.” Ellerin said he is keeping an eye on the number of COVID-19 cases in Europe, which is often a predictor for what happens in North America. Europe saw a surge in COVID-19 cases in March, but that surge has since failed.

Many areas of Massachusetts are seeing an uptick of COVID-19 casesincluding the city of Boston.

The rise of cases also comes as some large events are being held in-person for the first time since the COVID-19 pandemic began.

For instance, the Duckling Day Parade from the Parkman Bandstand in Boston Common to the “Make Way for Ducklings” sculpture in the Public Garden was held Sunday, the first such celebration since 2019.

In addition, the popular “Lilac Sunday” event returned to Harvard University’s Arnold Arboretum in Boston for the first time in three years.

Boston Mayor Michelle Wu was on hand for the Duckling Day Parade, which drew hundreds of children and their families.

Wu said there are no plans to reinstitute a mask mandate for the city, but she said the Boston Public Health Commission is closely monitoring the number of positive COVID-19 cases, COVID-19 hospitalizations and waste water testing data.

“If you look back at historic data from pandemics in the past, often Year 3 is when there’s a little bit of fatigue about living with these policies, but the virus is still very much here,” the mayor said.

The BPHC voted to drop Boston’s indoor mask mandate starting on March 5. But late last month, the city’s health commission released new safety precautions, which included a renewed push to wear masks while inside crowded places.

Dr. Todd Ellerin, chief of infectious diseases at South Shore Health, said the increase in people who are vaccinated against COVID-19 and those who are carrying antibodies will help combat the impact of future subvariants of the coronavirus.

“Even though the virus has gotten more contagious, we’ve also gotten stronger,” Ellerin said. “Overall, I’m optimistic about the fact that we continue to uncouple cases from hospitalizations and deaths.”

Ellerin said he is keeping an eye on the number of COVID-19 cases in Europe, which is often a predictor for what happens in North America. Europe saw a surge in COVID-19 cases in March, but that surge has since failed.

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