Greater Boston, Suffolk DA react to downtown juvenile attacks

Boston’s mayor said the city is working closely with state agencies to make sure children across the city and their families are given the support services they need. Michelle Wu’s comments come as police investigate at least five random attacks involving juveniles that have occurred across Boston, with the latest incident happening Wednesday evening in the Boston Common. Two Suffolk University students were attacked as they walked through the Common around 6:30 pm Boston police said they have identified two minors involved in an attack, one of whom will be summoned to court. A police report said the 11-year-old girl “began punching (the victim) and knocked her glasses off of her face. She then stepped on the glasses before punching again.”Police said an 11-year-old girl is too young to be charged under state law and a 13-year -Old boy will be summoned to juvenile court.The troubling crimes have frustrated police, who under law, cannot charge children under the age of 12.”We work very closely with our public safety agencies and our public health agencies to make sure there is coverage in the right places.There will be increased availability and access and visibility of our public safety agencies, especially in some of the areas where we’ve seen recent incidents,” Wu said.DCF is also investigating, but as the daylight attacks continue , some are taking ext ra precautions, worried they could be the next victims. Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden said his office was aware of the ongoing issues in downtown Boston.”We are well aware of the ongoing public safety threat occurring in the Downtown Crossing area, and we are well aware of the juveniles identified,” Hayden said in a statement. “We are also fully aware of and support the 2018 criminal reform legislation, which prohibits arrest or prosecution of children under the age of 12 and limits the ability of law enforcement agencies to hold children under the age of 14.” Hayden said under the legislation , the primary responsibility for preventing the attacks falls on city, state and community agencies.”We urge those agencies to take every possible measure to intervene with the children involved,” Hayden said. “Complaints have been issued against the older juveniles identified in these attacks and we are working with Boston Police to execute those complaints. We stand ready to work with all community and government partners to address this urgent issue.”

Boston’s mayor said the city is working closely with state agencies to make sure children across the city and their families are given the support services they need.

Michelle Wu’s comments come as police investigate at least five random attacks involving juveniles that have occurred across Boston, with the latest incident happening Wednesday evening in the Boston Common.

Two Suffolk University students were attacked as they walked through the Common around 6:30 pm

Boston police said they have identified two minors involved in an attack, one of whom will be summoned to court.

A police report said the 11-year-old girl “began punching (the victim) and knocked her glasses off of her face. She then stepped on the glasses before punching again.”

Police said an 11-year-old girl is too young to be charged under state law and a 13-year-old boy will be summoned to juvenile court.

The troubling crimes have frustrated police, who under law, cannot charge children under the age of 12.

“We work very closely with our public safety agencies and our public health agencies to make sure there is coverage in the right places. There will be increased availability and access and visibility of our public safety agencies, especially in some of the areas where we’ see recent incidents,” Wu said.

DCF is also investigating, but as the daylight attacks continue, some are taking extra precautions, worried they could be the next victims.

Suffolk County District Attorney Kevin Hayden said his office was aware of the ongoing issues in downtown Boston.

“We are well aware of the ongoing public safety threat occurring in the Downtown Crossing area, and we are well aware of the juveniles identified,” Hayden said in a statement. “We are also fully aware of and support the 2018 criminal reform legislation, which prohibits arrest or prosecution of children under the age of 12 and limits the ability of law enforcement agencies to hold children under the age of 14.”

Hayden said under the legislation, the primary responsibility for preventing the attacks falls on city, state and community agencies.

“We urge those agencies to take every possible measure to intervene with the children involved,” Hayden said. “Complaints have been issued against the older juveniles identified in these attacks and we are working with Boston Police to execute those complaints. We stand ready to work with all community and government partners to address this urgent issue.”

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